Feedly Begins Prepping Subscribers for Transition to the Feedly RSS Reader Cloud

It has been about 90 days since Google announced to the world that they were shutting down their Google Reader service on 01 July 2013.

That is just 13 days from now.

A lot has happened in the last 90 days as several companies have stepped up to try and fill that upcoming void.  Some have done it fairly well and others have had some growing pains but it seems everything is starting to click as that July deadline approaches.

One of the services that has been vying for Google Reader users is Feedly.

They have been connecting Google Reader users with their feeds from Google and using Google’s servers to deliver RSS items to users however, they are about to start the move to their own Feedly cloud to move off the Google services since they will be unavailable in less than two weeks.

According to a blog post today from Feedly the roll out begins today.

They break the move down into a few different stages.

  • Preparing – make sure the latest version of Feedly is installed on your device/system. Current version that is ready for the transition is 16.0.512.
  • Sync via the cloud – In the next 2-3 days all users should receive a green banner notice  that they are now on the Feedly cloud for their RSS feeds.
    • They will only migrate your last 1,000 shared items
    • All apps must be restarted to make sure your data is coming from the Feedly cloud on all devices/systems.
    • No history will be migrated so you start from a blank slate once you are on Feedly’s cloud.
    • Be patient because migrating this much data takes a while so there may be gaps as that completes.
  • Logging In – Google Authentication will continue to be used to access the Feedly Cloud. Eventually Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and LinkedIn will be supported.
  • When will I get upgraded – it is a rolling upgrade but expected to be completed by 21 June.

Feedly is doing a good job of setting expectations for the transition to their own service for users and that is good because you can be fairly confident that a migration of this magnitude will have its share of challenges.

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